10+ Grief Support Blogs to Read Today

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After the loss of someone close to you, it can be hard to find someone who understands your pain. And if you can’t find support, you may feel isolated. You need to find a support network, but where should you look? If you are the only one in your social circle dealing with grief it may feel difficult to turn to your friends. 

Jump ahead to these sections: 

  1. Shelby Forsythia
  2. Chasing Dragonflies
  3. Grief Healing Blog
  4. Debbie Augenthaler
  5. Mindfulness and Grief Institute
  6. Diary of a Widower
  7. Still Standing Magazine
  8. Confessions of a Funeral Director
  9. Hello Grief
  10. Elizabeth Benrendht

Luckily, there are other resources available. Facebook groups and other online support groups exist but could feel like too much. If you just want some passive help, try reading a grief blog. Whether you’re looking for a little empathy or the digital equivalent of books on grief, these resources have got you covered. 

1. Shelby Forsythia 

Forsythia hosts a blog and podcast. She covers both grief and recovery. When she was in college, her mom died. Coping with this, and other tragic incidents in her life, proved to be almost too much for her.

Shelby’s blog covers a wide range of topics and she writes as someone who has experienced grief and come to terms with it. Her articles include such titles as “Four Big Mistakes Parents Make When They Talk About Death”, “Grieving? Read These Five Books”, and “Seeing My Dead Mom in the Mirror.”

Shelby tackles how grief arrives in unexpected ways. A major part of what she writes about is what triggers her grief. For example, Shelby’s face is one of her triggers—she looks exactly like her mom. As she grows older, and closer to the age that her mother was when she dies, this realization is ever-striking. She writes about struggling with this knowledge and how it affects her daily life. 

2. Chasing Dragonflies

Kelly started Chasing Dragonflies after the death of her daughter. Kelly suffered a miscarriage and then, two weeks later, her oldest daughter Abigail passed away unexpectedly from a brain hemorrhage. Kelly covers all the emotions and reactions you may experience after a death. She has come to terms with her grief and is now working to figure out the different ways grief manifests. 

Especially for people mourning the loss of a child, this blog is a great resource. There are so many questions that come with such an experience. Do you mourn forever? Does thinking about them always hurt? Kelly answers all these questions and more on her blog. More than a blog, she’s fostered an entire community to help people cope and recover from loss. 

If you’re a Christian, this blog might be a great resource. Kelly is a practicing Christian, so some of her writing is about her faith, but her blog is a useful resource for everyone. Her blog covers a range of topics, from notes on her local Sunday sermons to thoughtful pieces on grief anniversaries. 

3. Grief Healing Blog 

Marty, the author of Grief Healing Blog, brings a lot of experience to the table. Marty has worked as a bereavement counselor for over 17 years. And she runs a pet loss support group. Her blog covers a lot of topics.

Harvested from her experiences as a supportive counselor, she attempts to address the common hurdles associated with grief. If you want advice tailored to your situation, you can also write to her. She regularly posts questions from readers along with her responses on the blog.  

4. Debbie Augenthaler

As a psychotherapist, Debbie’s mission is to help as many people as possible. She’s touched so many lives through her therapy practice. But Debbie has put her experiences online to help even more people. 

Debbie's blog answers pressing questions about grief. What will going to therapy for loss be like? What should I say to someone who is grieving? Why am I feeling this way? As you travel through your grief journey, questions may continue to pop up. Luckily, Debbie’s personal and professional experience has given her the ability to provide empathetic answers to these questions and many more. 

5. Mindfulness and Grief Institute 

The vast array of topics covered by Mindfulness and Grief Institute can be overwhelming. You can search by category in the sidebar.

Looking for posts about miscarriage? Or opioid overdose? This blog has a section for that. The Institute provides a forum for authors to share their feelings and experiences. If you are looking for a place to start this is a good resource to explore. 

6. Diary of a Widower

The Diary of a Widower chronicles the journey of a man who was widowed in his early forties. He writes about what it’s like to raise two kids as a single father while coming to terms with the loss of his wife. He also faces the additional challenge of helping his children navigate their grief. When it comes to helping life go on, it’s a challenge.

The blog ended in 2013, around the first anniversary of his wife’s death. After chronicling how his family’s life continued, and how he worked through loss, he chose to stop posting. However, the site is still active and can be a powerful tool if you are struggling with loss.  

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7. Still Standing Magazine 

Still Standing Magazine is a collection of writing on infertility and child loss. The writing feels personal, almost as if you could have written it yourself. That’s because it isn’t written by professionals; it’s written by other grieving parents. Still Standing takes submissions from writers all around the world. It collects their stories and publishes them so other grieving parents can see that they aren’t alone.

And if you feel like writing an article about your grief—and how you’re recovering—you can send it in. You’ll be able to see your words in print, exactly how you wrote them. Still Standing Magazine is a great resource if you are struggling with the loss of a child, or wanting to help someone with their grief after losing a child.

8. Confessions of a Funeral Director 

Death. Many people say that it’s easy to become desensitized to it. Thanatology, the study of death and human reactions to it, is based on this belief.  As people in your life die, you become aware of your mortality.

Caleb Wilde, a practicing funeral director, talks about this phenomenon on Confessions of a Funeral Director. Wilde has covered this subject from start to finish. He has a blog, a successful book, and has delivered several TedX talks on the subject. 

Most people are afraid of death. And even a funeral director, someone who is exposed to it every day, still fears it. But after watching so many families deal with this, Wilde knows the best approach.

Wilde shares his experiences helping all kinds of people with their grief, and how the only way to manage it is by being transparent and brave with your feelings. He shares lessons he has learned from his clients as a way to help those mourning come to terms with their feelings. This blog is a great resource for helping you learn how to talk about your grief. And it provides a unique insight into how a professional in the funeral service industry manages grief. 

9. Hello Grief

Avoidance and denial when it comes to loss are typical in today’s society. It’s something scary and irreversible, so why wouldn’t we treat it like the big bad wolf? Hello Grief argues that the reaction is understandable, but that doesn’t mean it’s helpful.

Hello Grief takes an educational approach to grief. Why do you feel the way you do? How can you cope with it? When you’re wrestling with these questions, it’s easy to feel like most people just don’t get it.

And that no one is wrestling with the same issues that you are. This blog attempts to answer the questions that arise when you are mourning. It covers a lot of topics, so hopefully you can find some answers. 

10. Elizabeth Benrendht 

Elizabeth’s blog is a very recent addition to the world.  In November of 2019, less than a month ago, her daughter overdosed on heroin and passed away. She’s walking through this journey of grief with each post she writes.

Elizabeth’s words serve as a reflection on her own indiscernible, messy feelings. Finding a way through her grief is important, but so is sharing that journey with others. 

Coping with Grief

Maybe you’ve read all the books, attended therapy sessions, and done your best to move on. But what if you’re still struggling? That’s natural. And you have to move at your pace. You can only do so much alone.

Whether you’re coping with the holidays or death anniversaries, it’s a challenge. While getting through difficult times is hard, these resources can support and help you. Even though grief will never leave you completely, these resources can help you manage it. If nothing else they can remind you that you are not alone.